Skip to main content

Full text of "The College greetings"

See other formats


&W<l\^ 






A/ 



e COLLEGE 
GREETINGS 



I 




DECEMBER -1915 




Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 
A Standard College 

Regular college and academy courses leading to 
Bachelor's degree. Pre-eminently a Christian 
college with every facility for thorough work. 
Located in the Middle West, in a beautiful, dig- 
nified, old college town, noted for its literary 
and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are 
looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

Jacksonville, Illinois 




Ol)£ College (Breetings 

The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the 
fifteenth of each month. 

Subscriptions, $1.00 a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 

Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



CONTENTS 

Editorial 3 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson 4 

Critical and Historical Essays 5 

Three Belated Pilgrims 7 

The Why and the Wherefore of Shoes 9 

Mrs. MacDowell 11 

Thanksgiving at the College 13 

Dramatic Club Tryout 14 

November Twentieth 17 

Students' Day 19 

Athletic and Y. M. C. A. Notes 20 

Dramatic and Freshman Notes 21 

Academy Notes 22 

Society Notes 23 

College of Music 26 

Expression Notes 28 

Art Notes 29 



Cfje College Greeting* 



Vol. XIX. Jacksonville, 111., December, 1915. No. 3. 



Faculty Adviser — Miss Jennie Anderson. 

Editor-in-chief — Ruth Want. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Alma Harmel. 

Assistant Editors — Norma Perbix, Margaret Slatten. 

Art Editor — Ruth Patton. 

Business Manager — Ruth Taylor. 

Assistant Business Managers — Phyllis Wilkinson, Ila Allen. 



Editorial 



EVERY day in the college one hears some mention 
of the all important subject of Endowment. Yet 
it is to be questioned if the students as a whole 
realize the significance of the present campaign. It 
has not yet been borne in upon many of us that if the 
effort is not successful Illinois Woman's College can no 
longer maintain its present high standing among col- 
leges. The future development of our college will be 
determined in the next four weeks. We know that 
seven years ago, the President and trustees raised the 
standard of work and broadened the course of study, 
in order to justify the use of a privilege that had never 
been exercised, that of granting degrees which should 



Page Three. 



T5\)t College Greeting* 



stand for four years of college work. In order to main- 
tain the high standard we have reached since that time, 
we must increase our endowment proportionately. If 
we fail in that what then can be the college policy ? 

A little contemplation leads us to appreciate the 
strain which weighs upon our president and his co- 
workers. What can we as students, who are most deep- 
ly concerned in the outcome, do to express our desire to 
help ? This is the question that has been asked many 
times by girls who have not had the opportunity to aid 
as did the students three years ago. One thing seems 
to lie open to us. It has recently appearel that over nine 
hundred dollars of the two thousand pledged by girls 
at that time, has not been paid. This is due not to lack 
of loyalty on the part of the pledgers perhaps, but 
rather to unexpected circumstances that, in some cases, 
made payment impossible. Nevertheless, the deficit re- 
mains, a debt of the whole student body. There are ten 
classes in the college, and if they should assume the 
amount and divide it, there would be no great burden 
upon any. It is worth considering surely. Whether this 
sugestion or some other be adopted, we know that 
whatever is done will be done by hearts that are aware 
of the crisis and eager to do their part in meeting it. 



MRS. CAROLINE A. WILSON— AN APPRECIATION 



We record with sadnes the death of Mrs. Caroline 
A. Wilson which occurred October 28, 1915, following a 
severe operation. Mrs. Wilson has been housekeeper at 
the Woman's College for the past three years, and was 
popular alike with both faculty and students. 

Page Four 



Z5l)e College (Breetings 



She was born in Jacksonville, January 14, 1852. 
The granddaughter of Peter Cartwright, one of the 
founders of the College, and the daughter of one of its 
early trustees, Rev. W. D. Trotter, Mrs. Wilson was 
herself a student in the school in the early seventies, 
and a member of Belles Lettres society. 

Truly in the midst of life we are in death. To-day 
at our accustomed task, to-morrow, the burden forever 
lifted and eternal rest. We feel that Mrs. Wilson is 
not dead, she is just away. We expect to meet her at 
every turn ; we listen for her merry laugh and her word 
of cheer as we pass along the halls, and we still live in 
the atmosphere created by her optimism. 



'CRITICAL AND HISTORICAL ESSAYS. 



It was in 1896 that Edward MacDowell, our leading 
American composer, accepted the position as Professor 
of music in Columbia University, entering upon his 
duties with two aims in view: first, to teach music 
scientifically and technically with the view of training 
musicians who should be competent to teach and com- 
pose ; secondly, to treat music historically and aesthet- 
ically as an element of liberal culture. In carrying out 
his plans, he conducted two lecture courses which are 
compiled in his "'Critical and Historical Essays." 

In these essays, he shows us the evolution of music 
from the very earliest savages, whose only form of 
music was the clapping of two objects together to get 
a rhythmical sound. With the beginning of music we 
see the first sign of a civilization. Hebraic music was 
very closely bound to religion. Its chief characteristic 

Page Five 



T5\)t College (Breetings 



was a sense of harmony and rhythm. There is very lit- 
tle known of the early music of the Egyptians, Assyr- 
ians and Chinese, but at any rate we the sure that they 
had not made much progress. With the Greeks and 
Romans, music gained independence. Heretofore it 
had been closely allied to early literature and dance 
rhythms. Hucbald and Guido d'Arezzo gave important 
contributions to progress, that of notation, formation 
of scales, and the idea that more than one sound could 
be played simultaneously. We see music becoming 
more emotional until we reach opera the highest form, 
as it is considered by many. However MacDowell here 
departs from this belief. He regards the music drama 
as represented by Wagner, the most perfect. The 
chief writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth cen- 
turies which he treated rather fully were Handel, 
Mendelssohn, Mozart, Rameau, J. S. Bach and Haydn. 

MacDowell gives us the feeling that he thoroughly 
understands the various processes of music. He does 
not hesitate to give us his own personal opinions, which 
are oftimes most radical. He was a wide reader as can 
be seen by his various references to other works. He 
kept in touch not only with the musical phase, but 
with the historical side as it is connected with music. 

He brings out most decidedly the mistake which 
so many people make that music is concerned only with 
pleasing combinations of sounds. This idea is due to 
lack of knowledge of the subject. Our musical edu- 
cation should begin when we are children in order to 
steer clear of this false idea. There runs throughout 
these essays the spirit of independent thinking, of 
breaking away from tradition, and of relying on one's 
own judgment. — Margaret Coultas, '16, 

Page Six 



Z3Ije College Greeting* 



THREE BELATED PILGRIMS. 



We know it is not the season for pilgrimages ; they 
are properly booked only as Chaucer booked them, in 
May when, 

"the yonge sonne 
Hath in the Ram his halfe cours yronne." 
But when three such interesting and insistent pil- 
grims, from Nowheresomewhere Land, crave the road 
of our pages, who has the heart to hold them back? 
Belated you say? And never catch up? Never mind, 
they're off for Canterbury. 

There was a Professor from North America 
That had come on the shipe Olympia, 
He seemed a worthy man I tell you true, 
For many things he learned had and knew, 
For he did teach the students of a college, 
To read and talk also the Latin language; 
As well as if it were their very own 
Aboute which they had forever known. 

He had a sclendre forme and talle 

Upon his head he wore a cappe smalle 

His clothe was grey and nothing did it lacke 
He wore also a heavy coat of blacke, 
For he was not as young as others some 

Of that fair compaignye that had come, 

Into the Tabard for this pilgrimage, 

And he felt more the cold on the viage. 

This lerned man had eyes small and blew 

With them he look'd a person through and through, 

He had a longe a nose and thinne 

And when he'd place his thumb beneath his chinne 

A finger in the corner of each eye 

He'd sit and think about what he did sigh. 

Then when our worthy host brot out the mete, 

He did not with the reste take his seate 

But much preferred to sit in a large chair 

Page Seven 



Blje College Greetings 

Before the fire warm; and on a trencher there 
The host brot him a glass with milk and bread. 
And after he had ete he went to bed. 

Miriam Anderson. 

A janitour ther was of a College, 

A brawny fellowe of lumbering carriage, 

Of his complexion he was full blacke 

In mysterye nothing did he lacke. 

Large were his eyes rollynge in his head, 

As for his lippes they were thick and reed. 

He knewe full well the girls in music halle 

Whatso' they weren whether short or talle 

Curteis he was to them and of service 

To carry water mornings was his gyse 

And many a nighte whan that it was darke, 

He would to hem sing as any larke. 

Full longed he to been a good musicioun 

To playe like the faculte was his ambitioun 

Also he knewe art as well as tunes 

And he was happy at the exhibitiounes. 

From which he had a liberal educatioun. 

Scarcely would you knowe him on Sunday 

All dressed up so fine to see his May 

Upon his lapelye a gay badge he bore 

For aught I wit he'd wonne it in the Cuban Warre. 

Forsooth he was a worthy man withalle 

And son of Woods his f elawes him did calle. 

Margaret Coultas. 

That day there rood with us a good lady 
Full strangely came to join our compaignye; 
For she had faren hard for many weke 
The martyr's tomb at Canterbury to seke, 
And just from out America had come. 
A suffffragette she hote was by some. 
And clad she was full simple and severe, 
After the way that I should name here: 
Her suit was of a pattern standardized 
According as her Woman's Club advised; 

Page Eight 



Z5\)t College (Breeltttgs 



Her skirt was short and of a fashion made 
That she divided it when there was nede, 
With many pockets sensible and wide. 
And when she rood her stede, 'twas astride. 
And she was lerned fer above us alle, 
Had studied long in many a college halle. 
She held in high regard fair Englond's queen 
Good Bess who ruled with a stately mien, 
And out of doubt, she placed next to her, 
The distant China's Empress Dowager; 
For they were set in books, so she thoughte 
That woman's independence might be taughte 
She found the dark a worthy man and good 
That well could ken the worth of womanhood 
But with our host she often had dispute 
Whan to shapen the journee, he would refute 
By his procedure, a single parte 
Of "Roberts' Rules in Parliamentary Arte," 
He liked hir nat but the good wif of Bathe 
By othe swor she'd follow in hir pathe; 
Until the very crack o' judgment doom 
Should summon both to hir eternal hoom. 

—Ruth Want. 



THE WHY AND THE WHEREFROM OF SHOES. 



I wonder why it is that we wear shoes. It may 
be that we wear them part of the time, because every- 
body else does, although I'm inclined to believe that I 
would wear them in the winter time whether others 
did or not. Then, I fancy some people think their feet 
look better incased in shoes. In fact, the Bible say, 
"How beautiful are the feet with shoes/' Probably all 
three of these combined, convention, comfort, and 
beauty, is the reason for putting on foot apparel. 

While protection and beauty may be the main uses 
of shoes, I can not omit mentioning some other servic- 

Page Nine 



T5\)t College Greeting* 



es foot-gear has rendered. The enrichment of our lit- 
erature is no small item. Who of you would not have 
felt a lack if you had never heard of Cinderilla and her 
glass slipper, of Gretel and her red-heeled boots, or of 
the Old Woman who lived in the shoe? Scarcely less 
important is the use made of slippers in parental dis- 
cipline, and in pounding nails at Illinois Womans Col- 
lege. 

Since shoes with their manifold uses have evident- 
ly come to stay, for some time at least, it is but natural 
that we should wonder about the wherefrom of shoes. 

Even in Scripture times we have reference to 
shoes, for we read "A man plucked off his shoe and gave 
it to his neighbor, and this was a testimony in Israel." 
(I quote this merely as a reference, and not as an ex- 
ample for you) From these ancient uses, in which 
the shoe was the sign of a contract, came the custom of 
throwing shoes after a bride and groom for good luck. 

The rudimentary covering for the foot was a san- 
dal consisting of a sole held in place by straps and 
thongs. Where the climate demanded greater protect- 
ion, the primitive people made a covering out of a single 
piece of untanned leather. Out of these two elements, 
sole without upper, and upper without sole was per- 
fected the shoe and boot. 

The simplest foot covering largely used through- 
out Europe is the sabot which is made from a single 
piece of wood. Closely related to this is the patten or 
clog, famous for its appearance in clog dances. 

To quote from an old-fashioned encyclopedist, "The 
fashion of shoes as well as other articles of dress has 
undergone innumerable changes. At one time shoes 
were pointed to an extravagent degree ; and in the last 

Page Ten 



X5l)fc College (Greetings 



century the high heels of the ladies shoes became a 
monstrosity. Shortly after the beginning of the 
present century the most marked improvement was the 
making of shoes right and left. In our day, the general 
disuse of the shoe proper and the introduction of short 
ankle boots are the chief changes of fashion." 

I wonder what this same writer would say to the 
changes of fashion in the present day. I fear he could 
scarcely get it into one small paragraph. Even I can 
remember when pointed shoes, then patent leather 
tipped ones, low shoes, high-heeled, low-heeled and now 
variegated shoes have become the prevailing style. It 
might seem that ere long the cycle would be complet- 
ed. Perhaps some physician will bob up to advocate 
the doing away with shoes entirely, and then we shall 
commence our cycle all over again. 

—Mae Blackburn, '16. 



MRS. MacDOWELL. 



It is difficult to say just what one would like about 
the coming of Mrs. MacDowell, November twelfth. 
She was to us not merely the advocate of a great cause, 
tho' she spoke with ease and charm. She was not 
merely the musician, tho' she played exceeding- 
ly well. The speaking and the playing were 
but outward signs of a rare and noble personality and 
the "Te Deums" of our hearts were not for the words 
or the music, but for herself and for the struggle, the 
high hopes, for the vision, and the passionate desire of 
her great husband, Edward MacDowell. Mrs. Mac- 
DowelPs visit should make the subject of creative art 

Page Eleven 



*C>S}e College (Greetings 



much more significant to us; and from it we should 
see more clearly and with reverence, the life struggles 
of the men and women of every age, who have staked 
their all to bring to a rather heavy, uninspired people 
the message of truth and of beauty that lies in the arts. 

DR. LAIDLER'S LECTURES. 



On Nov. tenth Dr. Laidler, organizing secretary 
of the Intercollegiate Socialist Society delivered two 
socialistic lectures. In the afternoon, he treated that 
especial phrase of the movement that includes Woman's 
Suffrage, while in the evening he discussed socialistic 
ideals as a whole. 

According to Dr. Laidler, socialism is the greatest 
political and economic fact in the world today. The 
socialist movement has already accomplished much to- 
ward democracy, toward human brotherhood, toward 
the uniting of nationalities and creeds. In Brussels, 
it was the socialists who tried to prevent the war. They 
do not believe in the individual ownership of factories 
but want the industries, which produce the necessities 
of life, to be publicly owned. 

The socialist believes in socialism, because he 
thinks that it is the result of economic evolution. As 
the slaves of Rome and as feudalism passed away, after 
they had outgrown their usefulness, so the wage sys- 
tem, which has been evolving, is fast outgrowing its 
usefulness. With the growth of industry, few laborers 
have a share in the factory ; they simply receive wages. 
On one hand the masses work hard for a little money, 
while on the other, a few work little and obtain much, 
Socialism would do away with this uneven state of af- 

Page Twelve 



Z5\)t College Greetings 



fairs. We are, indeed, tending toward public owner- 
ship more and more, in that governments are taking 
control of schools, health departments, and in- 
dustries which were formerly held by individuals. 

Socialism is desirable, because it will do away with 
the inequalities of wealth, it will obtain genuine po- 
litical, social and industrial freedom, and it will do away 
with waste and inefficiency. It will also furnish an 
economic foundation for the noblest in life. 

Thus, Dr. Laidler believes, socialism would solve 
that great problem which America has to face — the 
struggle of labor against capital. — Norma Perbix, '17. 



THANKSGIVING AT THE COLLEGE, 



On Thursday morning, November, twenty-fifth, 
the rising bell failed to ring at six-twenty. No, it was 
not because the electric bell had been forgotten in the 
excitement of the day, for that has never been known 
to happen, even though it is not automatic. However, 
at eight o'clock, the bell did summon us to breakfast, 
the first of the season. This was followed by the cus- 
• tomary wild scramble to be at the head of the line or 
as near there as possible. 

In the morning, the Thanksgiving service, in which 
all the churches of the city participated, was held at 
the Christian Church. 

At one-thirty, a long line of guests, faculty, and 
students filed down to the dining room, which had been 
beautifully decorated the evening before by the skilful 
hands of the Freshmen. Upon our place cards we were 
surprised to see a cut of the proposed gymnasium, a 

Page Thirteen 



T5l)£ College <Breetings 



picture that seemed as real to us as if the building al- 
ready stood upon our campus. After a sumptuous six 
course dinner, President Harker, as toastmaster, in- 
troduced Miss Mary Harrison, Miss Jennie Anderson, 
and Mrs. Annie Reavis Gist, who delivered toasts on 
endowment and the new gymnasium. We left the 
dining-room, grateful, not only for gifts that had come 
to us in the past, but also for those of the present, and 
for those that were sure to come to us in the future. 

That evening, we were entertained by some of the 
students. Thirteen members of the Academy cleverly 
presented the fairy-tale, "The Princess, Who Would 
Not Laugh," in the form of a moving-picture show. 
The Glee Club delightfully rendered two selections, 
"The Swing Song" and the "Slumber Boat". Anne 
Floreth and Hazel Ingram gave a one act farce, entitled, 
"Susan Clegg's Adopted." A vocal solo, by Elizabeth 
Witbeck, and a vocal duet, by Grace and Anna Reavis, 
were charmingly rendered. We enjoyed also a piano 
solo by Florence Cranston. 

Disbanding at a late h our, we voted that we would 
always retain happy memories of Thanksgiving Day 
1915. 

DRAMATIC CLUB TRYOUT. 



In the Illinois Woman's College 
Is a Club, an organization, 
A Dramatic Club, most worthy, 
But it takes a lot of talent, 
Heaps of brass and perseverance, 
To become an active member. 
Every Freshman, entering college 



Page Fourteen 



T5\)& College Greetings 



Looks with longing at the members, 

Wishes, yearns that she might be one, 

Wond'ring how they ever did it 

Passed that trial, that ordeal 

Necessary ere belonging. 

One day in the late October 

On the bulletin board was posted 

A small notice of great import 

Great the crowd that gazed upon it, 

Wond'ring, thinking, pond'ring o'er it, 

For it stated that a try-out 

Would be held before much longer 

For new members, and it added 

Each must learn a piece unaided, 

By herself must strive to learn it, 

Giving it without forgetting 

For an audience of Seniors, 

Faculty, and other wise ones, 

Fully known to be proficient 

In uncanny arts of judging. 

Then there followed hours of murmuring, 

Hours of talking, and excitement. 

"Who'll subject themselves to laughter 

To the frowns or criticism 

Of this awe-inspiring body ?" 

Many signed up, brave in spirit, 

Who, the fatal hour approaching, 

Crossed their names from the "Book of 

Domesday" 
Faltering as the time grew nigher. 
Many wished 'ere it was over 
They had followed this example. 
In the first week in November 



Page Fifteen 



*&l)& College Greetings 



Just at seven o'clock they called them 

Forth to come and get it over, 

This try-out of such importance, 

Many girls had wild hysterics, 

Clutching to each other grimly 

Till their cue to go was given 

Others paced the floor in waiting 

Muttering speeches, wild, dramatic, 

Tearing hair, with eyes out-bulging, 

Others meek, and pale of feature, 

Sat apart, with hands like iceburgs, 

Clenched upon their laps in terror. 

Yet the fear in the delaying 

Was as nothing to the terror 

Seizing one upon the entrance 

To this bare room, full of judges, 

Sitting calm, and still and rigid, 

Stern of face, with pads and pencils, 

Writing down your faults — your stutterings 

How your knees did shake beneath you, 

How your jaws were glued together, 

How your entrance was not pleasing. 

Your selection, full of humor 

Was but met with disapproval, 

As you hastened to the climax 

(One of wit) but when you gave it 

There they sat like bumps, disgusted, 

Sat there lost in icy silence 

Sat like clams, without a murmur, 

All eyes riveted upon you 

As you left that sad experience, 

Vowing never to repeat it. 

Thoughts came to you in this manner: 



Page Sixteen 



T5i)t College Greeting* 



"If indeed this is a sample 
Of the stony welcome given 
To a new aspiring member, 
Then I hope I didn't make it." 

— Romaine Loar, '18. 

NOVEMBER TWENTIETH 



"It pays to advertise." 

Ample proof of this has been furnished during the 
last three weeks to all unbelievers of the above modern 
slogan. Even the sleepiest of the "late-comers" to 
breakfast were suddenly awakened a few mornings 
ago, as a large placard with the words "November 
Twentieth — Save Date and Pennies," greeted them on 
their hurried way to the dining room. Guesses and 
speculations as to "what, where and why," were made 
by everyone, yet no one seemed to know the correct an- 
swer. As one after another new and novel placard 
mysteriously appeared, the suspense and fascination 
connected with that date, November twentieth, grew 
with each succeeding hint of the fun and good time we 
would have, provided that we did save our money until 
then. As soon as we had fully decided that we could 
not guess the secret, we were permitted to know that 
seventeen members of the Faculty would give a play 
for Endowment benefit in Music Hall, on the date form- 
erly announced. The cast of characters for "The 
Country School at Cracker's Bend," was next posted. 

Due to the character and quantity of advertis- 
ing, an enthusiastic audience witnessed the proceedings 
of a Friday's session of this school at Crackers Bend. 
Never was country school life so vividly portrayed as 

Page Seventeen 



T5\)t College Greeting* 



when Mrs. Ellis as Miss Sarah Crabtree, school- 
mistress, and her fourteen pupils began the daily- 
routine with the song, "Good Morning to You," 
sung in various chords and discords. Opening 
exercises finished, the regular class work be- 
gan with the class in advanced reading. This was an 
instant signal for all pupils unoccupied in this way to 
begin a series of entertaining pranks which lasted 
throughout the entire day. None of the proverbial 
characters had been omitted and each pupil had oppor- 
tunities to display brilliancy along some line, excepting 
Emmazilla Uphill, seemingly deficient in brilliancy 
along all lines. The visit of the inspector was made 
more impressive by his help in maintaining discipline 
as demonstrated upon little Johnny Short. 

Visitors arrived for the Friday afternoon program, 
and it was in this feature of the day that the pupils 
excelled. Hearty applause greeted each of the per- 
formers, and recitations, songs, composition, and a 
vocal duet were thoroughly enjoyed. 

This could not be called a one-star, but rather an 
all-star cast, and neither the success scored by the 
members of the faculty in their share toward endow- 
ment, nor the song typfying the spirit of the whole 
school for Endowment will readily be forgotten. 

It's a short time to January, 

It's a short time I know, 

It's a short time to January 

To make Endowment grow; 

Good-by hot hamburgers, 

Farewell to the square, 

I will save my money for Endowment 

For my heart's right there. 

— Reba Gaskins '18. 

Page Eighteen 



Z3l)e College ©reelings 



STUDENTS' DAY. 



With a start I woke and wondered if it really had 
been a touchdown. The yelling seemed to tell me yes, 
yet at the same time the pennants on the wall and the 
window curtain tickling my face were trying to con- 
vince me that I was still in Harker Hall, I. W. C. Then 
the peculiar high-pitchedness of the yells became more 
noticeable and at once the Woman's College idea over- 
balanced the foot ball illusion. But why there should 
be such racket at that unearthly hour was more than 
I, poor Freshman, could understand, unless, it could 
be my wicked neighbors trying to make me hear the 
rising bell for once. Suddenly the words "Student Gov- 
ernment" came to me, and I remembered that it was 
November twelfth, Students' Day, the anniversary of 
full-fledged student government. 

Breakfast time that morning was rather exciting, 
too. Winding in and out among the tables for full ten 
minutes is good for developing appetites, but rather 
hard on those already developed. 

To me, a girl that had never known anything but 
student government, the chapel hour proved quite il- 
luminating. Some of the girls who had been here be- 
fore gave an original playlet in two acts, the first re- 
producing scenes from college life before self-govern- 
ment, and the last scenes since the charter has been 
granted. Of course both were more or less exaggerat- 
ed, I suppose, yet the change of attitude of the girls 
toward their own responsibility was well illustrated. 
Besides we have many more privileges than we used 
to have, and I like that. 

Page Nineteen 



'Cfye College (Greetings 



That night after we had a torch light parade with 
a sing around a big bon-fire we closed the celebration 
with a snake dance on the campus. I had a worn out 
voice the next day, but worse than that my roommate 
had a worn out dust-pan and fudge-spoon. My, but 
such excitement is fun! 

Zip, bah, boom bah, 

Rip, rah, re, 

Zip, zedi kiyi 

I. W. C. 

ATHLETIC NOTES. 



The Athletic Association is now well started for 
the year. Nearly all of the girls, both old and new, 
are numbered among its members and everyone is 
very enthusiastic. It was necessary to elect two 
members of the executive staff, Edna Robb being our 
new president and Miriam Anderson, vice-president. 

Three hike clubs have been formed among the 
college students, aside from the Academy club, and an 
exciting hare and hound chase took place Oct. 25, be- 
tween these clubs. Great interest is being shown in 
the basket-ball classes, and we hope for some excellent 
work when the annual inter-class games are played. 



Y. W. C. A. 



The devotional meetings have been very interest- 
ing the past month. It was indeed a great pleasure 
and opportunity to have Miss Banbridge, general sec- 
retary of the City Association at Springfield, with us 

Page Twenty 



X5l)e College (Greetings 



the thirteenth of November. At the Sunday meeting 
Miss Banbridge gave us an excellent talk on city work. 
Not only the Association as a whole but also the girls 
who met Miss Banbridge personally were very much 
helped by her inspirational and charming manner. 

Oh, what is going to happen the twentieth ? Well, 
I am sure I don't know, but there is something coming 
off in February. Look at the little blue card on Harker 
Hall bulletin board. 

A sweet so good we now have found, 

You'll want to buy it by the pound. 

Now hurry up, and get in line, 

Buy Brewster's Chocolate. Oh, it's fine! 

The Y. W. C. A. bazar which is to be held Dec. 
4 is just the place to buy your Christmas presents. 
Save your money and come to buy. Watch the posters. 



DRAMATIC CLUB NOTES. 



The club welcomes the following new members: 
Ruth Patton, Romaine Loar, Frances Smith, Ruth 
Grantham, Eleanor Sherrell, Margaret Towle, Mamie 
Kennedy, Frances Sconce, Olive Scott, Anna Margaret 
Gist, and Mary McGhee. 

Monday evening December sixth, is the date 
decided upon for the Club's first play of the season — J. 
M. Barries' well known "Quality Street." 

FRESHMAN NOTES. 



We are very glad to have Mrs. Ellis as our class ad- 
viser. She helped us plan our first class affair, a picnic 

Page Twenty-one 



T3lje College (Brettlttgs 



at Nichols Park, the twenty-third of October. Every- 
one had a good time, and we all became much better 
acquainted. 

November the sixteenth, we challenged the Sopho- 
mores to a hare and hound chase before breakfast. As 
we expected, we reached our destination safely and 
waited for the other people to find us. By the time 
they did discover us, we all were ready for the eats 
we had taken with us. 

Our election for the Freshman Committee on the 
twenty-sixth of October resulted as follows: 

Mary Fowler, chairman, Bess Seward, treasurer, 
Isabelle Carlton, Louise Shoop, Esther Fields. 



ACADEMY NOTES. 



This has been a month of gayeties for the whole 
Academy. Our class advisers entertained us at a most 
enjoyable party on Oct. 25th in Expression Studio, at 
which each class gave a stunt. On Saturday Oct. 30, 
about thirty-five of us picniced at Gravel Springs and 
had a jolly ride home on the hay racks, making the 
ride most delightful by our yells and songs. On Nov. 
6, the Academy Hike Club hiked to east woods as hares, 
pursued by members of two other hike clubs, as hounds. 

The Academy Glee Club has six new members this 
year, which make the club fifteen. We have not begun 
our rehearsals as yet, but expect to do so soon. 

On Monday the fifteenth, the fourth Academy was 
delightfully entertained at a six o'clock dinner by Ruth 
Harker and Mildred Barton. Mrs. Hartmann sang 
many selections for us charmingly. Other guests were 

Page Twenty-two 



Z5l)e College Greeting* 



Mrs. Harker, Miss Mothershead, and Jeanette Preetor- 
ius, one of our old girls. 



LAMBDA ALPHA MU. 



The Lambda members and several of the new girls 
spent a very jolly afternoon at the leaf -raking and 
marshmellow toast given by Mary Louise Powell at her 
home, November the eighth. 

The program of our open meeting November ninth 
was particularly interesting. A paper, "A Century of 
Dress" was read, with illustrations in costume by Reba 
Gaskins, Hazel Kuinear, and Pauline Herrman. The 
instrumental numbers by Edith Brown were also much 
enjoyed. 

We were happy to have our former President Marie 
Louise Witbeck with us to spend the Thanksgiving 
holiday. 

Edith Colton, one of our former members, was 
married last month at her home in Woodson, 111., to Mr. 
William Schofield of Jacksonville. They will reside on 
the groom's farm near Lynnville. 

The society is glad to announce the following pledg- 
es: Isabelle Carlton, Lela Geyer, Erma Knapp, Mabel 
Weiss, Olive Gerrick, Cordelia Randolph, Louise Reed, 
Bess Seward, Geneva Anderson, Edith Adams, Lucille 
Washburn, Velma Varney, and Ruth Grantham. 



THETA SIGMA. 



Theta Sigma gave its formal party at Colonial Inn 
on Saturday evening, October thirteenth. The plan of 

Page Twenty-three 



*&\)t College (Breetings 



entertainment was threefold. The first part was a 
travelague through I. W. C, read by Anne Floreth and 
illustrated by Ruth Patton with pictures thrown on a 
screen. An operatic farce in which Ila Allen was 
the heroine, Helen McGhee the hero, and Anne Floreth 
the villian followed. A set of conundrums answerable 
with the names of popular inventions comprised the 
third part. Decorations were carried out in the soci- 
ety colors, scarlet, black and gold, and with the society 
flower, yellow chrysanthemums. 

In addition to the new girls, we were glad to have 
as our guests ; Dr. and Mrs. Harker, Miss Mothershead, 
Miss Mary Anderson, Miss Cowgill, Miss McLaughlin, 
Miss Gleckler and Miss Robinson. 

Theta Sigma is glad to announce the following 
pledges of 1915; Bernice Bowen, Kittie Bunting, Lois 
Carpenter, Grace Hasenstab, Myra Kirkpatrick, Marie 
Limerick, Mary McGhee, Florence McCloud, Frances 
Mead, Helen Purcell, Roxie Poland, Rachel Rexroat, 
Ethel May Simpson, Gladys Stobie, Muriel Thompson, 
Ola Lux and Mary Whiteside. 

Monday evening November 22nd the Pledges were 
at home for the old Theta Sigma girls in the Society 
Hall. A lovely two course luncheon was served. 



BELLES LETTRES NOTES. 



If you had happened in the hall Saturday evening, 
November thirteenth, you probably would have been 
greatly surprised to find yourself in Japan. It was a 
Japanese Fete given for the new girls. The hall was 
artistically and beautifully decorated in cherry blos- 

Page Twenty-four 



"C^e College (Greetings 



soms, lanterns, chrysanthemums and everything that 
suggested Japan. The tea booth added much to the 
attractiveness of the decorations. Everyone wore a 
real Japanese kimona and followed out Japanese cus- 
toms during the evening. Ima Berryman sang two 
charming little Japanese songs and Miss Gleckler read 
"Madame Butterfly" in a very pleasing manner. Vari- 
ous Japanese games also added merriment to the Fete. 
Late in the evening a two course luncheon was served. 
We were glad to have Mrs. Harker, Miss Mothershead 
and Misses Johnston, Coultas, Knoff and Cowgill as our 
guests. 

We enjoyed a week end visit over November sixth 
from Blanche Loveless, one of our last year members. 
She stayed until Wednesday. Helen Thomas of Win- 
chester spent the week end of November thirteenth 
with us and attended our Japanese Fete. 

Ruth Taylor and Joy Webb are with us again, and 
and all of us are glad to have them back. We are 
happy that Gertrude Wilson can be back for Thanks- 
giving, and are also expecting several of the old girls 
back. 

We welcome sixteen pledges into our society : Flor- 
ence Cranston, Mary Fowler, Rowena Rogers, Irene 
Cunningham, Mabel Pawling, Marion Schoel, Catherine 
Madden, Marie Iliff, Margaret Towle, Esther Fields, 
Winifred Bruff, Francis Smith, Jessie Clem, Louise 
Schoop, Edith Hillerby, and Zoe McNeill. 

PHI NU NOTES 



Phi Nu enjoyed the second cozy the first of this 
month, and many of our town members were present. 

Page Twenty-five 



O^e College ©reelings 



The Eighth of November we entertained with a 
breakfast at Colonial Inn, after which a delightful pro- 
gram was given. Our meetings, too, on the study of 
art have been especially beneficial and interesting. 

Phi Nu is very glad to welcome as pledges the fol- 
lowing girls: Anne Ellis, Francis Fisher, Louise Ba- 
ker, Vera Teachout, Helen Dick, Helen Irwin, Lucille 
Sudduth, Georgia Goodwin, Ruth Wallace, Doris Har- 
pole, Lora Whitehead, Mary Elizabeth Frazier, Musa 
Fellows, Charlotte Hungate, Helen McDonald, Lucille 
Howell, Mildred Applebee, Miriam Pendleton and Paul- 
ine McMurphy. 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC NOTES 



A large number of out of town pupils are enrolled 
in the Colege of Music this year and this branch of our 
work is growing rapidly. 

The facuties of the College of Music and Art en- 
tertained the College faculty, trustees and a few other 
friends for Mrs. MacDowell after the concert, Nov. 12. 
While in town, Mrs. MacDowell was the guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry V. Stearns at their residence at 825 
West College Ave. 

Quite a large number of students and a goodly 
sprinkling of faculty went to Springfield to hear the 
master violinist, Fritz Kreisler on Thursday evening, 
November 11. Because of the large number going, a 
special train was made up and the trip was especially 
pleasant. All who went agreed that the concert more 
than repaid for the slight discomfort of the trip. 

A very large number of students attended the con- 
cert by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra on the 

Page Twenty-six 



X31)e College <&reetln<js 



evening of Nov. 24. The program was interesting 
and wide in its scope and proved a very enjoyable even- 
ing. 

The larger part of the College appropriation of 
the Library fund in the College of Music this year, will 
be spent in filling one of the long felt needs, namely, a 
new adition of Groves Dictionary of Music. This work 
is to musicians what the Encyclopaedia Britannica is to 
the world of general knowledge, and this last edition 
is much the most complete authoritative and interest- 
ing of any. With the balance of appropriation and cer- 
tain other funds available, several additional books will 
be added, although they have not been definitely se- 
lected. 

Miss Lazelle was soloist in the opening reception of 
the Springfield Woman's Club the latter part of October 
and was soloist at the first Presbyterian Church on Sun- 
day, November 7, at the dedication of the new organ. 
During her absence, Mrs. Hartmann sang at Grace 
Methodist Church where her solo in the morning con- 
tributed greatly to the service. 

Mr. McClellan, the assistant violin teacher, is meet- 
ing with great success in his work. A large class is well 
established in Beardstown, and great interest is mani- 
fested everywhere over his work. 

Because of the unusually large enrollment in the 
department this year, it has been necessary to add an 
assistant teacher. The person selected for this is an 
alumna of this College, Miss Dean Obermeyer, of the 
class of '14. 

A string quartette has been organized in the Col- 
lege of Music and gives promise of pleasant future per- 
formances. 

Page Twenty-seven 



^>^>e College (Greetings 



MR. STEARNS HEARD IN HIS ANNUAL RECITAL 



A very interesting piano recital was given in Music 
Hall, Thursday evening, Nov. 4, 1915, by Mr. Henry V. 
Stearns, Director of the College of Music. 

Mr. Stearns is a pianist of rare ability, excelling 
both in technique and interpretative power. His pro- 
gram was of the highest character and was thoroughly 
enjoyed by everyone. 

"• 
EXPRESSION. 



On the evening of November eighth an unusual 
opportunity was afforded us in having "The Taming of 
the Shrew" interpreted by Miss M. Louise Gleckler, Di- 
rector of the School of Expression. In her cutting Miss 
Gleckler reduced the play to the one plot, that of Kath- 
erine and Petruchio, so admirably that the Ben Greet 
players have purchased it for their own presentation. 

Both in the interpretation of the eight characters 
and in her artistic ability as shown in voice and action, 
Miss Gleckler fully met our anticipations. 

The Literary and Analysis class is now working 
upon narrative and dramatic relations. They are en- 
joying short programs given by its members Thursday 
and Saturday afternoons. 

A very interesting program was given at criticism 
class Saturday Nov. 6. All students of expression be- 
long to these criticism classes. The numbers on the 
program of this class show the work accomplished in 
private lessons. 

Friday evening, November nineteenth, Miss Gleck- 
ler gave a program at the Masonic Banquet at Woodson. 

Page Twenty-Eight 



t3l)e College (Erecting* 



ART NOTES 



The College is planning to have another exhibition 
of pictures by American painters sometime during the 
second semester. The pictures will come from one of 
the large exhibitions of contemporary art in the East. 

The School of Fine Arts has recently purchased a 
copy of Owen Jones' "Grammar of Ornament" which 
has been given by the department to the College library. 
The "Grammar of Ornament ,, is a very valuable book 
containing many colored plates depicting all epochs of 
historic ornament, and is a great boon to Design II. 

Miss Knopf has been invited to contribute a pic- 
ture to the John H. Vanderpool Memorial Collection of 
the John Vanderpool School in Chicago. The collection 
is to comprise the work of former students of Mr. Van- 
derpool and that of his artist friends. Miss Knopf has 
sent her picture "The Walnut Grove", which was ex- 
hibited at the Chicago Art Institute in one of the large 
exhibitions during 1913. 

Costumes from the Hallowe'en party have added 
to the attractiveness of the last sketches in the Friday 
Sketch Class. The girls who have posed in costume 
are Olive Scott and Marion Scholl. Others who have 
posed this month are Lillian Bush, Lucile Switzer, and 
Vera Teachout. 



Mrs. E. — Miss H. what is it that has four legs and a seat 
and is made for a person to sit on? 

No answer. 

Mrs. E. — Why, it is a chair. 

P. H. — Oh, I thought you said it was for ONE person to sit 
on. 



Page Twenty-nine 



STYLISH APPAREL FOR YOUNG 

WOMEN 

SUITS, DRESSES, MILLINERY 
CLOAKS, WAISTS, LINGERIE 

In addition to the Newest Models in Ready-to-wear Garments 
from the Best Makers — we are showing the Correct Styles 
in CORSETS,— the Newest HOSIERY, Street and Evening 
Gloves, Dainty Neckwear, Handkerchiefs, Ribbons, Toilet 
Articles, Art Goods. 

F. J. WADDELL & COMPANY 



Dr. — For my advice. 

Patient — Oh, I'm not going to take it! 



PHELPS & OSBORNE 

IS THE COLLEGE GIRL'S 
STORE 
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS, RIBBONS, LACES, AND NOTIONS 

POPULAR PRICES ALWAYS 

FASHIONABLE DRESS MAKING 
AND TAILORING 

A FULL LINE OF DRESS TRIMMINGS 
MRS. EMMA CORRINGTON 

ILLINOIS PHONE 547 241 WEBSTER AVE. 



Secretary Photographer's Association of Illinois. 

Awarded Silver Medal for Home Photographer at Illinois State 
Convention, 1914 

OTTO SPEITH 

PORTRAITURE BY PHOTOGRAPHY 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



GIRLS— PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS. 



ROBERT H. REID 

"Photographs That Please" 

Member Photographer's Association of America 
HOCKENHULL BUILDING 



Cafe 



Confectionery 



peacock *3tin 



Catering 



Soda 



Candies 



PIEPENBRINGS 

VARIETY STORE 
ONE BLOCK EAST OF COLLEGE 

CANDIES, CAKES, COOKIES, 

PIES, SANDWICHES, 

POP ON ICE, GROCERIES 

CALIFORNIA FRUITS 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



"The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispette Shop 



Pop-corn That Melts in Your 
Mouth 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

EAST STATE ST. 



Miss A. — Sumptuary laws are passed to regulate expense, 
e. g. All gondolas in Venice had to be painted black. An ex- 
ample ? 

M. H. — All gasoline cans must be painted red. 



(Tafe !&ate 

And Annex for Ladies. 
221=223 EAST STATE STREET 

Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



Wedding 
Reception 
Banquets 
Luncheons 
c^sS^^^^Hk- Musicals 
/ttrtlOWal^jf Theater Parties 
l^f^^r^l 11 ^ Dinner Parties 
^^ Card Clubs 
Special attention to aU College functions 

VICKERY'S 

Jacksonville, 111. 



OUR PICTURES 

ARE HUNG IN THE BEST HOMES IN THE CITY 
AND COUNTY 



Mollenbrok & McCullough Studio 

WEST STATE ST. 



THE 



Big City Market 

All Kinds of Fancy 
Fruit 

CANNON BROS, 

W. StateSt. III. Phone 1288 

WE DELIVER 



SEE 

BONANSINGA 

FOR 

Fancy Fruits 

Confectionery 

72 East Side Square 



Stud. — I have something preying on rriy mind. 
Prof. — You must be hungry. 
Dr., as patient leaves — One dollar, please. 
Patient — Why? You gave me no medicine. 



KODAK- FINISHING 

This is our SPECIALTY— You Want the BEST Results— 
Our Workmanship and Materials Give Them 

VAIL-.& VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 East Side Square 



Jacksonville Candy Company 

We have just installed our New Soda Fountain, and we 
can serve everything in the confectionery line Hot or Cold 
— Also wemake all kinds of Homemade Candies and guarantee 
them under the pure food law. 

We have the very best electric Piano at our store. 
57 E. SIDE SQUARE B. J. GEANETOS, Prop. 

BOTH PHONES 566 



The Home of Good Things to Eat 

Walker's 


W. E. Boston 

DEALER IN GROCERIES AND 


Grocery 

Homemade 

BREAD, CAKES, COOKIES 

SALAD DRESSING, Etc. 


MEAT 
600 EAST COLLEGE AVENUE 


205 East Morgan Both Phones 


Both Phones 100 



FLORETH & COMPANY 

LEADERS IN EVERYTHING NEW IN MILLINERY 
COATS FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILREN 
DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES FOR CASH 



Ideal Bread 

is Better; 
so are the cakes 



DORWART'S CASH 
MARKET 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH AND 

SALT MEATS, FISH, POULTRY 

ETC. Both Phones 196 

230 WEST STATE STREET 




THAT OUR HOME-MADE CANDIES ARE MADE TO PLEASE 

YOU 

That you can get what you want like you want it here in the 
way of SUNDAES, SODAS, and all kinds of HOT DRINKS 

JUST PHONE 70— WE DELIVER. 

MtulUttix $ Dfamilton 

21 6 East State Street 



LATEST STYLES IN 

FALL & WINTER MILLINERY 
Pisk Hats a Specialty 



Mrs. M. OTSfeil 

206 East State Street 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Millinery 
Needlecraft, Corsets 



S. Side Square 



Miss J, to R. M. — Ruth, now did you hurt your ankle? 
R. M.— Oh! I sat on it. 

Miss J. to treasurer of Y. W. C. A. — Please, don't let Ruth 
sit in the treasury. 



L. C. & R. E. HENRY 
DEALERS IN FINE MILLINERY 



Always Something New and 

Up-to-Date 

238 South Side Square 




Cloaks. S mrs. FursandMiu 

jACKSQ*V/LL£ t tU* 

Low Prices and Square Dealings 
Keep Us Busy 



5V 

%* 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



Want 

Cut flowers 

FROM 



BOTH PHONES 



WEST STATE STREET 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE 

Harold J. Johnson, Mgr. 



High Class-Vaudeville & Pictures 

4-Piece Orchestra Afternoon 

and Evening 

A BIG Special Feature Every Monday 

PRICES 5 and 10c 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 



ALWAYS THE 
LATEST AND 
BEST IN 
MOTION 
PICTURES 



I. C. In Physics quiz — The base-ball is given a certain twirl 
by the picture. 



HARRY HOFMANN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers 

Plants 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



Greenhouse South Diamond Street 

Store: Bell Phone 154—111. 182 
Greenhouse, Bell 775 



We Pipe Your House for 
GAS 

OR WIRE IT FOR 

ELECTRICITY 

AT COST 

Jacksonville Ry & Light Co. 

TWO YEARS TO PAY 224 S. MAIN 



J. P. BROWN 

MUSIC HOUSE 

Musical Talking 

Merchandise Machines 

Sheet Music 
19 S. Side Square, Jacksonville 




Jacksonville^ Foremost Store for 

Men 

And Specialties for Women 

Knitted Silk Coats 
Sweater Coats, Student Caps 
Manish Rain Coats and Hats 
Trunks and Hand Bags 



REAL ENJOYMENT 

The kind that lasts and is pleas- 
ant to recall — 
in one of our fine rigs, or help 
her arrange a Hay Ride Party. 
Phone us for Carriages for any 
occasion 

EITHER PHONE 850 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



R. W. — Mary, who is your letter from? 

M. H. — I don't know; can't tell by the birthmark. 



<oover 



&Sk 



reve 



Have a Complete Line of Drugs, 
Kodaks, Perfumes 

Stationery and Holiday Gifts 

We Do Developing and Printing 

East & West Side Sq. 



We Welcome You as a Student 
after Knowledge 



Pleased to have you call on your 
down town trips 



Badger Drug Store 



235 E. State St. 



Illinois 57 



Sch 



VISIT 

JEWELRY STORE 

WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Also Good-looking and Cood-wearing Goods. 
Will Be Pleased to Show Them. 



GO TO THE 

RUSSELL & LYON 

JEWELRY STORE 

FOR THE BEST REPAIRING OF 
ALL KINDS 



E.W.BASSETT 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 
DIE STATIONERY 
ENGRAVED CARDS 
SILVER AND GLASS 
ART POTTERY 
NOVELTIES 
No. 21 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



Editor to the Printer — Can't you tell where the jokes begin 
when you're reading the copy? 

The printer — Oh, yes, but I can't tell where they stop. 



BRADY BROS. 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 
House Furnishings and Paints 
45-47 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



GAY'S 



RELIABLE 



HARDWARE 




ytmur 



COLLEGEJOOTWEAR 

Large assortment of Foot- 
wear for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-Room 
Footwear. 

HOPPERS 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



MATHIS, KAMM & SHIBE 

SAY 

This is just to remind you that 
we can suply any and all of 
your FOOTWEAR needs. 



CITY STEAM 

Cleaning and Dyeing Works 

208 E. State 

E. A. SCHOEDSACEK, Proprietor 



Party Dresses, Kid Gloves 

Sliippers a Specialty 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



STYLE + QUALITY + FINE SHOE MAKING 



THE GYPSY BOOT 
WILL BE THE 
LEADING STYLE 
THIS FALL 




WE HAVE THEM 

IN 

BRONZE KID 

BLUE KID 

NAT KID 



"> SHOE C0.< 



Complete Line of Evening Slippers 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO. 



Society Programs and Menus 
THE ROACH PRESS 

ILLINOIS PHONE 236 OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 

Our Customers Say: "The Service is a little better." 



LENG. MAGILL 

FOR PRINTING 

PROGRAMS, INVITATIONS 
PERSONAL CARDS, ETC. 

No. 227 EAST STATE STREET 
Illinois Phone 418 

Our Motto: "Not how cheap, but how 
good." 



JOB PRINTING OF ALL KINDS 

JOHN K. LONG 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 
Programs and Stationery 

213 WEST MORGAN STREET 
ILLINOIS PHONE 400 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



Bl)e <Braj>l)lc 7&rts 
Concent 



PRINTERS 
PUBLISHERS 
STATIONERS 
Engraved Cards 
Artistic Programs 
for Special Occasions 



I.M.BUNCE&CO 



PRINTING 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Plain China for Decorating 



COLLEGE GIRLS: 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters 
Manito Hosiery. Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery 

LUKEMAN BROS. 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



Cfje &per* Jfrattonal ilanfe 

Established 1852 



CAPITAL 

$200,000 

SURPLUS 

$50,000 

DEPOSITS 

$2,000,000 




UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 

POSTAL SAVINGS 
DEPOSITORY 

MEMBER OF 

FEDERAL 

RESERVE BANK 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
We have provided a Special Department for Ladies with a window 
for their exclusive use in transacting their business, also a Ladies' writ- 
ing room adjoinng, daintily furnished, which is at their disposal. 

OFFICERS 

M. F. Dunlap President O. F. Buffe Cashier 

Andrew Russel V. President H. C. Clement Asst. Cashier 
Chas. B. Graff V. President W. G. Goebel Asst. Cashier 
H. J. Rodgers V. President H. K. Chenowith Ast. Cashier 
Arthur Vannier Ast. Cashier 



DIRECTORS 



Owen P. Thompson 
E. F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 
Andrew Russel 



George Dietrick 
H. M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
M. F. Dunlap 



FOR THOSE WHO DISCRIMINATE 

We simply suggest that it has taken our constant effort to please the 
students who come to our city. We select only the BEST materials and 
and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 

PURE CANDIES, HOT AND COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

AND PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES. 
Telephone 227 ALL PACKAGES DELIVERED 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

227 WEST STATE STREET 



CJ.DEPPE&CO. 

Known for "Ready-toWear" and 
Popular Priced Dry Goods 



KUM-RITE-IN 
Let Us Show You the Most Complete 
Line of Silk Hosiery, Silk Gloves, 
American Lady Corsets, Kid Gloves, 
Fancy Neckwear, Laces, Ribbons 
and Trimmings. 



DRY GOODS STOR1 



Louise S.— Speaking of exterior and interior angles, called 
them external and internal. 

V. A. uses her bandaged hand as an eraser. 

J. C, lifting a 500 lb. weight— It isn't hard to lift 500 lbs. 



H Safest Place to Trade £1 
ILLERBY'S 



DRY GOODS STORE 

PHONES 309 



P FURS 
SWEATERS 
HOSIERY 



LADIES 

FRANK BYRNS, 



HAT STORE 



Dr. ALBYN LINCOLN ADAMS 

OCULIST AND AURIST 

To the State School for the Blind 

323 WEST STATE STREET 



Practice Limited to Diseases of the 
EYE, EAR, NOSE & THROAT 
Both Telephones 



Dr. GEORGE E. STACY 

(Northwestern University) 
S. E. Cor. Square (over Hoppers') 



Sees patients by appointment, at of- 
fice and elsewhere. Office hours: 11 to 
1; 2 to 4. Telephones: Bell 435, 111. 
1335 and (home) 1334. 



ALPHA B. APPLEBEE 

DENTIST 

326 WEST STATE STREET 



Dr. AUSTIN C. KINGSLEY 

DENTIST 

409 AYERS BANK BUILDING 

Both Phones 760 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



S.S.KRESGECO. 

5 and 10c STORE 



A POPULAR PLACE for COLLEGE 
GIRLS 




212-214 E. State St. 



Cloaks, Suits, Furs 
and Millinery 

At Prices Tkat Arc Rigkt 



ft* 



Everything for the Home 

J\ridLir& 



Everything for the Home 

Andre 




Student Headquarters 
for Room Furnishings 



The Best Goods for the Price, No Matter What the Price. 

Andre <§b Andre 



The 
Gift 
Store 



The 
Gift 
Siore 



DRUGS BOOKS 

City Drug and Book 

Store 

J. A. OBERMEYER & SON 

S. Side Square 

Give Us a Call 
Bell 457 III inois 572 

College Suplies Pennants 



ALDEN BROWN 

314 W. STATE ST. 

Pictures Artist 

Frames Materials 



HAIRDRESSER. 

Artistic hairdressing, Shampooing, Manicuring, Facial 
Massage. Treatment of the Hair and Scalp, my specialty 

Will call by appointment. 
MRS. JOHN R. DUNN Residence 640 S. Prairie St. 

Illinois Phone 1194. 



AH the faculty, students and friends 
of the College should have a checking 
or sayings acount with 

F. G. Farrell & Co. 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell President 

E. E. Crabtree V. President 

H. H. Potter Cashier 

M. W. Osborne Ass't Cash. 



Pacific Motel 

Jacksonville^ 111. 
Jacksonville's Best Hotel 



70 ROOMS 



S. M. CAMPBELL, Manager 




Some hae meat that canna eat, 
And some would eat that want it, 
But we hae meat, and we can eat, 
Sae let the Lord be thankit. 



Burns— Grace Before Meat.